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Most trusted JOB oriented professional program
DevOps Certified Professional (DCP)

Take your first step into the world of DevOps with this course, which will help you to learn about the methodologies and tools used to develop, deploy, and operate high-quality software.

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DevOps to DevSecOps – Learn the evolution
DevSecOps Certified Professional (DSOCP)

Learn to automate security into a fast-paced DevOps environment using various open-source tools and scripts.

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Get certified in the new tech skill to rule the industry
Site Reliability Engineering (SRE) Certified Professional

A method of measuring and achieving reliability through engineering and operations work – developed by Google to manage services.

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Master the art of DevOps
Master in DevOps Engineering (MDE)

Get enrolled for the most advanced and only course in the WORLD which can make you an expert and proficient Architect in DevOps, DevSecOps and Site Reliability Engineering (SRE) principles together.

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Gain expertise and certified yourself
Azure DevOps Solutions Expert

Learn about the DevOps services available on Azure and how you can use them to make your workflow more efficient.

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Learn and get certified
AWS Certified DevOps Professional

Learn about the DevOps services offered by AWS and how you can use them to make your workflow more efficient.

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Git Commands Tutorials and Example: Git Fetch – Update remote branch before merge to local branch

Best practice says that before you commit in git, you need to either do git pull or git fetch/merge. However, there is a way to find out wheather your branches is not in sync with remote.

To check the remote repo status you are really simulating a “fetch”
$ git fetch -v –dry-run

To bring your remote refs up to date
$ git remote -v update

This command will print whether the branch you are tracking is ahead, behind or has diverged with remote. If it says nothing, the local and remote are the same.
$ git status -uno

To pull
$ git pull origin <<branchname>>
or
$ git fetch origin <<branchname>>
$ git merge remote/<<branchname>>
$ git commit

Compare the two branches:
$ git log HEAD..origin/master –oneline

Rajesh Kumar
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