Clover and Maven working with Distributed Applications

clover-and-maven-working-with-distributed-applications

clover-and-maven-working-with-distributed-applications

1.       Configure maven clover plugin.

2.       Build the all components with clover enabled.

3.       Deploy the clover enabled build to test server.

4.       Run the tests.

5.       Create & Review the Code Coverage Report.

Configure Maven Clover Plugin

Configure the maven plugin in pom.xml .If you are having multi module projects; you can configure the plugin in parent-pom instead of modifying each module’s pom xml.


Build all components with clover enabled.

Run the following command.

 

  “mvn -U clover2:setup package clover2:aggregate

 

                If you got something like this

[INFO] Loaded from: C:\Documents and Settings\Administrator\.m2\repository\com\cenqua\clover\clover\2.6.3\clover-2.6.3.jar

[INFO] Clover: Commercial License registered to ABC Corporation.

[INFO] Creating new database at ‘C:\p4_depot\trunk\4A\target\clover\clover.db’.

[INFO] Processing files at 1.5 source level.

[INFO] Clover all over. Instrumented 5 files (1 package).

[INFO] Elapsed time = 0.532 secs. (9.398 files/sec, 812.03 srclines/sec)

Congratulation, you get clover work with your source!!

 

Deploy the clover enabled build to test server.

Deploy the Clover enabled build to the server. The same process as normal

Copy the Clover registry file to the appropriate directory on each of the test servers

 

The registry file is the DB file create during compile, defined by initstring parametersclover‐setup task, this needs to occur after the Clover build is complete, and before you run your tests

 

Background: the Clover initstring

 

FileName: xxx.db

At build time, Clover constructs a registry of your source code, and writes it to a file at the location specified in the Clover initstring. When Clover‐ instrumented code is executed (e.g. by running a suite of unit tests), Clover looks in the same location for this registry file to initialise itself. Clover then records coverage data and writes coverage recording files next to the registry file during execution

Notes: gives the folder contains the registry file full control permissions

 

Recommended Permissions

Clover requires access to the Java system properties for runtime configurations, as well as read write access to areas of the file system to read the Clover coverage database and to write coverage information. Clover also uses a shutdown hook to ensure that it flushes any as yet unflushed coverage information to disk when Java exits. To support these requirements, the following security

permissions are recommended:

 

grant codeBase “file:/path/to/clover.jar” {

permission java.util.PropertyPermission “*”, “read”;

permission java.io.FilePermission “<>”, “read, write”;

permission java.lang.RuntimePermission “shutdownHooks”;

}

 

Grant Permissions to clover.jar

Edit the java.policy file of the java runtime on the test server

%JAVA_HOME%/jre/lib/security

 

Copy clover.jar and license file to the java runtime class path of the test servers

%JAVA_HOME%/jre/lib/ext

 

 

Run the test suite

Run the test suite as normal. Either automation test case or manual test case.

 

Create Code Coverage Report

Copy the coverage recording files to build machine.

 

Once test execution is complete, you will need to copy the coverage recording files from each remote machine to the initstring path on the build machine in order to generate coverage reports.

 

Background: CoverageRecording Files

 

Filename:xxx.dbHHHHHHH_TTTTTTTTTT or clover.dbHHHHHHH_TTTTTTTTTT.1 (where HHHHHHH and TTTTTTTTTT are both hex strings)

CoverageRecording files contain actual coverage data. When running instrumented code, Clover creates one or more Coverage Recorders. Each Coverage Recorder will write one CoverageRecording file. The number of Coverage Recorders created at runtime depends the nature of the application you are Clovering. In general a new Coverage Recorder will be created for each new ClassLoader instance that loads a Clovered class file. The first hex number in the filename (HHHHHHH) is a unique number based on the recording context. The second hex number (TTTTTTTTTT) is the timestamp (ms since epoch) of the creation of the Clover Recorder. CoverageRecording files are named this way to try to minimise the chance of a name clash. While it is theoretically possible that a name clash could occur, in practice the chances are very small.

CoverageRecording files are written during the execution of Clover‐instrumented code. CoverageRecording files are read during report generation or coverage browsing.

 

Run the generating report goal to create the report.

                                “mvn clover2:clover”

               

Rajesh Kumar